Greenland

Europe

About Greenland

Sara and John say...

If ever a country had a misleading name! This vast rocky land, covered in hundreds of metres of ice, does not have much greenery. Yet, for part of the year, southern coasts of Greenland can be mild, even warm! Which is why tourists and scientists swell the local population to enjoy this arctic wilderness.

For most of the year, Greenland is frigid and inhospitable to all but the most hardy and well-equipped. Strong winds add to the extremely low temperatures, making conditions thoroughly dangerous.

However, after many months of darkness, the rising sun brings a thaw to some central and southern coastal settlements, such as Nuuk, Ilulissat and Tasiilaq.
Daytime temperatures through the summer months can rise several degrees above freezing. Indeed in some sheltered fjords, highs can reach an almost unbelievable 20 Celsius on calm, midsummer days.

But when the sun does come out, shining through the clear air and reflecting off the sea and ice, it can burn! Suncream is an essential.

Even in the middle of summer, the weather can turn very quickly. Cloudy skies prevail, with showers of rain, sleet and snow quite commonplace. They quickly knock temperatures on the head and bring a chill reminder of how far north we really are. So, whether whale-watching or hiking, pack warm and wet weather gear, as well as the shades.

But with the right conditions, the rare privilege of viewing the northern lights can be yours!

Quick facts about

Greenland

Capital:

Currency:

Nuuk

Danish Krone

Language:

Inuktitut, Danish

Average weather in

Nuuk